Title

No Nurses, No Healthcare

Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Poster Presentation

Challenges Theme

Building Viable, Healthy and Safe Communities

Your Location

Windsor, Ontario

Faculty

Faculty of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kemplin

Abstract/Description of Original Work

No Nurses, No Healthcare

Introduction

Registered Nurses leave the workforce en masse: 57% leave nursing within their first year of graduating (Killian, 2016). To tourniquet this hemorrhage, hospital systems often offer pandering incentives to improve nurse retention. Despite Nursing Retention Programs (NRPs) implemented offering incentives, training, and awards, the World Health Organization (WHO, 2013), estimates current global nursing shortages of 7.2 million with 12.9 million by 2035. Nearly one-fourth of Canadian nurses leave their hospital jobs each year which costs approximately $25,000 per nurse (Canadian Nursing Association, 2009). To our knowledge, we performed the first academic analysis of statistical methods used to quantify NRPs in nursing retention and turnover rates. Through a rigorous analysis of the literature through our integrative review, we found investigations wholly ineffective in addressing nursing retention. Our preliminary analysis found a lack of efficacy and gaps in quantifiable measurements among research on NRPs on nurse retention and found inconsistencies among NRPs and retention research suggesting limited external validity. Our recommendations for immediate interventions could prevent a systemic break down of Canadian healthcare from the nursing shortage.

We will present a rigorous analysis of current research strategies and provide actionable recommendations for Windsor health authorities to implement locally and province-wide.

This submission reflects multiple pillars of building viable, healthy and safe communities Grand Challenge Theme.

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No Nurses, No Healthcare

No Nurses, No Healthcare

Introduction

Registered Nurses leave the workforce en masse: 57% leave nursing within their first year of graduating (Killian, 2016). To tourniquet this hemorrhage, hospital systems often offer pandering incentives to improve nurse retention. Despite Nursing Retention Programs (NRPs) implemented offering incentives, training, and awards, the World Health Organization (WHO, 2013), estimates current global nursing shortages of 7.2 million with 12.9 million by 2035. Nearly one-fourth of Canadian nurses leave their hospital jobs each year which costs approximately $25,000 per nurse (Canadian Nursing Association, 2009). To our knowledge, we performed the first academic analysis of statistical methods used to quantify NRPs in nursing retention and turnover rates. Through a rigorous analysis of the literature through our integrative review, we found investigations wholly ineffective in addressing nursing retention. Our preliminary analysis found a lack of efficacy and gaps in quantifiable measurements among research on NRPs on nurse retention and found inconsistencies among NRPs and retention research suggesting limited external validity. Our recommendations for immediate interventions could prevent a systemic break down of Canadian healthcare from the nursing shortage.

We will present a rigorous analysis of current research strategies and provide actionable recommendations for Windsor health authorities to implement locally and province-wide.

This submission reflects multiple pillars of building viable, healthy and safe communities Grand Challenge Theme.