Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty

Faculty of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor

Kate Kemplin

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Background: Burnout has been an overwhelming concern among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic has increased stress for nurses in both their personal and professional lives, especially due to the increasingly limited healthcare resources. Poor patient-staff ratios and other organizational stressors have exacerbated the poor mental health conditions of nurses and caused many to rethink their choice of careers.

Purpose: The purpose of this integrative review is to explore the effects of co-existing mental health disorders and the development of burnout due to the increasing patient-staff ratio for Registered Nurses working on acute care units during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods: Keyword searches included burnout, nurse-to-patient ratios, COVID-19, and mental health using nursing research databases (CINAHL, Pubmed, and Proquest) for peer-reviewed articles between 2017 to 2022. The results and outcomes were synthesized and compared for significance regarding nursing burnout and mental health relating to nurse-patient ratios following Whittmore and Knafle integrative review design.


Results: Preliminary results determine that high nurse-to-patient ratios put nurses with co-existing mental health at higher risk for burnout. Data analysis is ongoing and final results will be available at the time of the conference.

Conclusion: The results will provide an in-depth review of the current literature surrounding how nurse-patient ratios affect nurse burnout and overall mental health. This will help to define implementation strategies to ultimately decrease nurse burnout and improve mental health in attempts to increased career satisfaction and overall patient well-being.

Availability

March 29th, 31st or April 1st

Special Considerations

Presenters will include all or a few of the following article authors: Jennifer Babin, Hailey Rice, Maryrose Janisse, Karina Berendsen, and Allison Mack.

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Mental Health and Burnout Relating to Staffing Ratios Among Nurses during the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Integrative Review

Background: Burnout has been an overwhelming concern among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic has increased stress for nurses in both their personal and professional lives, especially due to the increasingly limited healthcare resources. Poor patient-staff ratios and other organizational stressors have exacerbated the poor mental health conditions of nurses and caused many to rethink their choice of careers.

Purpose: The purpose of this integrative review is to explore the effects of co-existing mental health disorders and the development of burnout due to the increasing patient-staff ratio for Registered Nurses working on acute care units during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods: Keyword searches included burnout, nurse-to-patient ratios, COVID-19, and mental health using nursing research databases (CINAHL, Pubmed, and Proquest) for peer-reviewed articles between 2017 to 2022. The results and outcomes were synthesized and compared for significance regarding nursing burnout and mental health relating to nurse-patient ratios following Whittmore and Knafle integrative review design.


Results: Preliminary results determine that high nurse-to-patient ratios put nurses with co-existing mental health at higher risk for burnout. Data analysis is ongoing and final results will be available at the time of the conference.

Conclusion: The results will provide an in-depth review of the current literature surrounding how nurse-patient ratios affect nurse burnout and overall mental health. This will help to define implementation strategies to ultimately decrease nurse burnout and improve mental health in attempts to increased career satisfaction and overall patient well-being.