Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Simon Rondeau-Gagné

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Conjugated polymer nanoparticles, or CPNs, are highly versatile nano-structured materials that have amassed great interest due to their straightforward synthesis, biocompatibility, and tunable properties.1 The properties of CPNs can be tuned by varying the composition of the surfactant conjugated to the polymer core of these nanoparticles, rendering them suitable for a variety of applications including many in the realm nanomedicine.1 This tunability is key for the design of new drug-delivery systems and therapeutics as the CPN size and structure directly impact important properties, such as the blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and drug target selectivity.2 Similarly, lipids and lipid-based nanomaterials have been widely studied as nanocarriers transporting various therapeutics in drug delivery systems because of their non-toxic and biocompatible nature.3-5 In this work, the synthesis of an isoindigo - based CPN system is demonstrated with four different lipid surfactants; – DMPC (14:0), DMPS (14:0), DPPC (16:0) and DPPS (16:0). The size, morphology and fluorescence properties of the resulting nanoparticles have been characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The development of this lipid-containing CPN system places an emphasis on elucidating lipid – CPN structural relationships by harnessing the differences in the properties of lipids to control the shape and size of the CPNs produced. The resulting lipid-CPN systems and the new structure-relationships unraveled in this work contribute to the refinement of nanomedicine by unveiling novel design criteria in nanomaterials. This new knowledge will open new avenues for improved efficiency in treatments and consequently establish a novel family of nanomaterials as an alternative drug delivery system for cancer treatment.

References:

1. Tuncel, D.; Demir, H. V., Conjugated polymer nanoparticles. Nanoscale 2010, 2 (4), 484-494.

2. Rizvi, S. A. A.; Saleh, A. M., Applications of nanoparticle systems in drug delivery technology. Saudi Pharm J 2018, 26 (1), 64-70.

3. Yingchoncharoen, P.; Kalinowski, D. S.; Richardson, D. R., Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy: What Is Available and What Is Yet to Come. Pharmacol Rev 2016, 68 (3), 701-787.

4. Scioli Montoto, S.; Muraca, G.; Ruiz, M. E., Solid Lipid Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Pharmacological and Biopharmaceutical Aspects. Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences 2020, 7.

5. Bhalekar, M. R.; Madgulkar, A. R.; Desale, P. S.; Marium, G., Formulation of piperine solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy 2017, 43 (6), 1003-1010.

Availability

Mar. 29 : 12-1pm, Mar. 30: 1:30-3pm, Mar. 31: 12-1pm

Special Considerations

Presenter: Monika Kojic

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Building a Toolbox for Drug Delivery: Lipid-based Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles

Conjugated polymer nanoparticles, or CPNs, are highly versatile nano-structured materials that have amassed great interest due to their straightforward synthesis, biocompatibility, and tunable properties.1 The properties of CPNs can be tuned by varying the composition of the surfactant conjugated to the polymer core of these nanoparticles, rendering them suitable for a variety of applications including many in the realm nanomedicine.1 This tunability is key for the design of new drug-delivery systems and therapeutics as the CPN size and structure directly impact important properties, such as the blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and drug target selectivity.2 Similarly, lipids and lipid-based nanomaterials have been widely studied as nanocarriers transporting various therapeutics in drug delivery systems because of their non-toxic and biocompatible nature.3-5 In this work, the synthesis of an isoindigo - based CPN system is demonstrated with four different lipid surfactants; – DMPC (14:0), DMPS (14:0), DPPC (16:0) and DPPS (16:0). The size, morphology and fluorescence properties of the resulting nanoparticles have been characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The development of this lipid-containing CPN system places an emphasis on elucidating lipid – CPN structural relationships by harnessing the differences in the properties of lipids to control the shape and size of the CPNs produced. The resulting lipid-CPN systems and the new structure-relationships unraveled in this work contribute to the refinement of nanomedicine by unveiling novel design criteria in nanomaterials. This new knowledge will open new avenues for improved efficiency in treatments and consequently establish a novel family of nanomaterials as an alternative drug delivery system for cancer treatment.

References:

1. Tuncel, D.; Demir, H. V., Conjugated polymer nanoparticles. Nanoscale 2010, 2 (4), 484-494.

2. Rizvi, S. A. A.; Saleh, A. M., Applications of nanoparticle systems in drug delivery technology. Saudi Pharm J 2018, 26 (1), 64-70.

3. Yingchoncharoen, P.; Kalinowski, D. S.; Richardson, D. R., Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy: What Is Available and What Is Yet to Come. Pharmacol Rev 2016, 68 (3), 701-787.

4. Scioli Montoto, S.; Muraca, G.; Ruiz, M. E., Solid Lipid Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Pharmacological and Biopharmaceutical Aspects. Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences 2020, 7.

5. Bhalekar, M. R.; Madgulkar, A. R.; Desale, P. S.; Marium, G., Formulation of piperine solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Drug Development and Industrial Pharmacy 2017, 43 (6), 1003-1010.