Submitter and Co-author information

Alexandra DiFazio, University of WindsorFollow

Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kichler and Dr. Ménard

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Introduction:

The Impostor Phenomenon (IP) refers to the emotions, cognitions, and behaviours of objectively successful individuals who believe their achievements are not due to personal capabilities or intelligence, but external factors or assessment errors. The development of the IP has been correlated with differing parenting styles utilized by a mother and father respectively when rearing a child. Although parenting styles may play a role, it is highly improbable that they are the sole explanation as to why some individuals report feeling like an impostor. Instead, other variables are likely also involved. Resent research has studied self-efficacy (i.e., a person’s belief in their ability to accomplish a task) as another contributing factor to the development of an individual’s IP feelings. The current study aims to explore what mediational role, if any, self-efficacy has in the relationship between parenting styles and the IP in undergraduate university students.

Methods:

Data was collected through convenience sampling from 80 undergraduate university students via a self-report survey containing demographic questions as well as measures of parent style, self-efficacy, and impostor phenomenon.

Results:

The results are pending as data analysis is still ongoing. Results will be available at the time of the conference.

Conclusion:

This research will likely contribute to understanding the development of the IP in relation to differing parenting styles and differing levels of self-efficacy in undergraduate university students. Results will help create a greater awareness of the IP on university campuses with the potential to aid in more IP-related resources for students.

Availability

March 29: 10am-3pm, March 30: 11:30am-2:00pm, March 31: 1:00pm-3:00pm, April 1: 12:00pm-3:00pm

Special Considerations

Presenter: Alexandra DiFazio

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Parenting Styles and the Impostor Phenomenon: The Mediating Role of Self-Efficacy

Introduction:

The Impostor Phenomenon (IP) refers to the emotions, cognitions, and behaviours of objectively successful individuals who believe their achievements are not due to personal capabilities or intelligence, but external factors or assessment errors. The development of the IP has been correlated with differing parenting styles utilized by a mother and father respectively when rearing a child. Although parenting styles may play a role, it is highly improbable that they are the sole explanation as to why some individuals report feeling like an impostor. Instead, other variables are likely also involved. Resent research has studied self-efficacy (i.e., a person’s belief in their ability to accomplish a task) as another contributing factor to the development of an individual’s IP feelings. The current study aims to explore what mediational role, if any, self-efficacy has in the relationship between parenting styles and the IP in undergraduate university students.

Methods:

Data was collected through convenience sampling from 80 undergraduate university students via a self-report survey containing demographic questions as well as measures of parent style, self-efficacy, and impostor phenomenon.

Results:

The results are pending as data analysis is still ongoing. Results will be available at the time of the conference.

Conclusion:

This research will likely contribute to understanding the development of the IP in relation to differing parenting styles and differing levels of self-efficacy in undergraduate university students. Results will help create a greater awareness of the IP on university campuses with the potential to aid in more IP-related resources for students.