Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Other: (please identify)

Panel

Faculty Sponsor

Tim Brunet

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Voices in Undergraduate Research Experience (VURE) brings awareness to opportunities for undergraduates to do academic research and creative work, especially students who identify as members of a minority community. Opportunities to engage in research work and creative activities can enhance a student’s opportunity freedoms, confidence, and sense of belonging (Hart, 2012 and 2019; Walker 2008). Additionally, a key outcome for socially just higher education experiences should include opportunities for social mobility, to engage in theoretical and powerful knowledge, and to learn skills for the knowledge economy (Calitz, 2017; Olssen & Peters, 2005; Wheelahan, 2012). The VURE team initiated a listening process to gather advice and solicit support from various stakeholders like the Office of Human Rights, Equity, and Accessibility, the Anti-Black Racism Task Force, and the Aboriginal Education Centre, amongst many other offices. In the ongoing listening process, the VURE team aims to understand questions of belonging across groups as rationales for undergraduates' desire and awareness of conducting research and creative work with faculty and their peers (Langford & Clance, 1993; Stiwich, McCunn, and Dayal). VURE aims to establish a reflective and engaged student network that inspires inclusive affiliations among peers, research networks, and faculty researchers (Walker, 2006, 2008; Weeks, Villeneuve, Hutchinson, Roger, Versnel, & Packer, 2015). This is a panel presentation with four University of Windsor undergraduate students.

References

Calitz, T. M. (2017). Designing capability-informed pedagogy using participatory student research. In Socially Just Pedagogies, Capabilities and Quality in Higher Education (pp. 153-175). Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Hart, C. S. (2012). Aspirations, education, and social justice: Applying Sen and Bourdieu. A&C Black.

Hart, C. S. (2019). Education, inequality and social justice: A critical analysis applying the Sen-Bourdieu Analytical Framework. Policy Futures in Education, 17(5), 582-598.

Langford, J., & Clance, P. R. (1993). The imposter phenomenon: Recent research findings regarding dynamics, personality and family patterns and their implications for treatment. Psychotherapy: theory, research, practice, training, 30(3), 495.

Olssen. M. & Peters, M.A. (2005) Neoliberalism, higher education and the knowledge economy: from the free market to knowledge capitalism, Journal of Education Policy, 20(3), 313-345, DOI: 10.1080/02680930500108718

Stiwich, K. D., McCunn, L. J., & Dayal, C. (2019). Woolly Stories: An Art-Based Narrative Approach to Place Attachment. Engaged Scholar Journal: Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Learning, 5(2), 245-253. https://doi.org/10.15402/esj.v5i2.68348

Walker, M. (2008). A human capabilities framework for evaluating student learning. Teaching in Higher Education, 13(4), 477–487. doi: 10.1080/13562510802169764

Weeks, L. E., Villeneuve, M. A., Hutchinson, S., Roger, K., Versnel, J., & Packer, T. (2015). What We Learned about Mentoring Research Assistants Employed in a Complex, Mixed-Methods Health Study. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 45(4), 207–228. https://doi.org/10.47678/cjhe.v45i4.184492

Wheelahan, L. (2012). Why knowledge matters in curriculum: A social realist argument. Routledge.

Special Considerations

Samuel Jokodola, Anumita Jain, Carol Adu-Bobie, Noelle Dupret Smith, and Sydney Fuerth. This is a panel presentation with four University of Windsor undergraduate students.

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Voices in Undergraduate Research Experience (VURE) Panel Session

Voices in Undergraduate Research Experience (VURE) brings awareness to opportunities for undergraduates to do academic research and creative work, especially students who identify as members of a minority community. Opportunities to engage in research work and creative activities can enhance a student’s opportunity freedoms, confidence, and sense of belonging (Hart, 2012 and 2019; Walker 2008). Additionally, a key outcome for socially just higher education experiences should include opportunities for social mobility, to engage in theoretical and powerful knowledge, and to learn skills for the knowledge economy (Calitz, 2017; Olssen & Peters, 2005; Wheelahan, 2012). The VURE team initiated a listening process to gather advice and solicit support from various stakeholders like the Office of Human Rights, Equity, and Accessibility, the Anti-Black Racism Task Force, and the Aboriginal Education Centre, amongst many other offices. In the ongoing listening process, the VURE team aims to understand questions of belonging across groups as rationales for undergraduates' desire and awareness of conducting research and creative work with faculty and their peers (Langford & Clance, 1993; Stiwich, McCunn, and Dayal). VURE aims to establish a reflective and engaged student network that inspires inclusive affiliations among peers, research networks, and faculty researchers (Walker, 2006, 2008; Weeks, Villeneuve, Hutchinson, Roger, Versnel, & Packer, 2015). This is a panel presentation with four University of Windsor undergraduate students.

References

Calitz, T. M. (2017). Designing capability-informed pedagogy using participatory student research. In Socially Just Pedagogies, Capabilities and Quality in Higher Education (pp. 153-175). Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Hart, C. S. (2012). Aspirations, education, and social justice: Applying Sen and Bourdieu. A&C Black.

Hart, C. S. (2019). Education, inequality and social justice: A critical analysis applying the Sen-Bourdieu Analytical Framework. Policy Futures in Education, 17(5), 582-598.

Langford, J., & Clance, P. R. (1993). The imposter phenomenon: Recent research findings regarding dynamics, personality and family patterns and their implications for treatment. Psychotherapy: theory, research, practice, training, 30(3), 495.

Olssen. M. & Peters, M.A. (2005) Neoliberalism, higher education and the knowledge economy: from the free market to knowledge capitalism, Journal of Education Policy, 20(3), 313-345, DOI: 10.1080/02680930500108718

Stiwich, K. D., McCunn, L. J., & Dayal, C. (2019). Woolly Stories: An Art-Based Narrative Approach to Place Attachment. Engaged Scholar Journal: Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Learning, 5(2), 245-253. https://doi.org/10.15402/esj.v5i2.68348

Walker, M. (2008). A human capabilities framework for evaluating student learning. Teaching in Higher Education, 13(4), 477–487. doi: 10.1080/13562510802169764

Weeks, L. E., Villeneuve, M. A., Hutchinson, S., Roger, K., Versnel, J., & Packer, T. (2015). What We Learned about Mentoring Research Assistants Employed in a Complex, Mixed-Methods Health Study. Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 45(4), 207–228. https://doi.org/10.47678/cjhe.v45i4.184492

Wheelahan, L. (2012). Why knowledge matters in curriculum: A social realist argument. Routledge.