Standing

Graduate (PhD)

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

N/A

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Covering nearly two years of autoethnographic experience, this article will use the poetic form, more specifically 32 haiku, tanka, and broken verse poems written between 2020 and 2022, to make sense of the role that social positionality (daughter, wife, mother, PhD student, academic employee, patient etc.) and environmental factors (COVID-19 governmental restrictions and institutional red-tape) assume in the creation of social suffering. Stemming from two distinct traditions of classical social scientific thought, namely, an intersectional and symbolic interactionist perspective, this article will seek to undermine both what exactly it means to suffer and the hegemonic conceptualization of social suffering as a one-size-fits-all experience. This combination of the autoethnographic and poetic lens will enable the effective spotlighting of subjective experience and give way to the development of new and continuing discussions on the complexity and conflict that occurs between ‘the mitigated Self’ and ‘Society’ in times of extreme social change.

Availability

March 29th - 12:00pm- 1:00pm, March 30th - 12:00pm -2:00pm, April 1 - 12:00pm - 2:00pm

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Special Considerations

The article spotlighted for this conference is one of several articles that I have been working toward crafting to address the importance of Arts Based Research (ABR) methods in Social Scientific research.

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The Last of the Leaves: Weaving Words of Social Suffering and the Act of Living

Covering nearly two years of autoethnographic experience, this article will use the poetic form, more specifically 32 haiku, tanka, and broken verse poems written between 2020 and 2022, to make sense of the role that social positionality (daughter, wife, mother, PhD student, academic employee, patient etc.) and environmental factors (COVID-19 governmental restrictions and institutional red-tape) assume in the creation of social suffering. Stemming from two distinct traditions of classical social scientific thought, namely, an intersectional and symbolic interactionist perspective, this article will seek to undermine both what exactly it means to suffer and the hegemonic conceptualization of social suffering as a one-size-fits-all experience. This combination of the autoethnographic and poetic lens will enable the effective spotlighting of subjective experience and give way to the development of new and continuing discussions on the complexity and conflict that occurs between ‘the mitigated Self’ and ‘Society’ in times of extreme social change.