Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Francesco Biondi

Abstract/Description of Original Work

In this study, we look at the effects that the COVID-19 lockdown measures enacted in March 2020 had on driving patterns. We hypothesize that the greater portability of remote working associated with the drastic decline in personal mobility, accelerated distracted and aggressive driving. We conducted an online survey where 103 respondents reported on their own and other drivers’ behavior. While respondents agreed to drive less frequently, they also indicated that they were not prone to more aggressive or distracted driving. When asked to report on other motorists’ behavior, however, they indicated to have witnessed more aggressive and distracted drivers on the road after March 2020 relative to the time pre-pandemic. We reconcile these findings with the literature on self-monitoring and self-enhancement bias, and use the studies on the effect of comparable large-scale, disruptive events on traffic patterns to discuss our hypothesis on how driving patterns may change post-pandemic.

Availability

Thursday, March 31st, 12-1:30pm and April 1st, 12-2pm

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Investigating the Effect of the Covid-19 Pandemic on Drivers' Behavior: A Survey Study

In this study, we look at the effects that the COVID-19 lockdown measures enacted in March 2020 had on driving patterns. We hypothesize that the greater portability of remote working associated with the drastic decline in personal mobility, accelerated distracted and aggressive driving. We conducted an online survey where 103 respondents reported on their own and other drivers’ behavior. While respondents agreed to drive less frequently, they also indicated that they were not prone to more aggressive or distracted driving. When asked to report on other motorists’ behavior, however, they indicated to have witnessed more aggressive and distracted drivers on the road after March 2020 relative to the time pre-pandemic. We reconcile these findings with the literature on self-monitoring and self-enhancement bias, and use the studies on the effect of comparable large-scale, disruptive events on traffic patterns to discuss our hypothesis on how driving patterns may change post-pandemic.