Standing

Undergraduate

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Simon Rondeau-Gagné

Abstract/Description of Original Work

From the phones at our fingertips to the solar panels on our roofs, humans are becoming increasingly dependent on electronics for information, entertainment, and to power their daily lives. Further advancements are paving the way for a new age of high-performance, flexible devices. Organic electronics made from conjugated semiconducting polymers are showing great potential as a softer and more processable material than brittle silicon used in today’s devices, while exhibiting comparable charge transport to silicon.

However, one key challenge with these organic polymers is the difficulty to control their optical properties and charge transport in devices. Electronics must interact with and alter their lighting while efficiently conducting electricity. Therefore, the desired material must be tuneable to precisely control these important properties. In this research, a novel organic diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated polymer is presented as a leading candidate for optoelectronics. This polymer uses noncovalent metal-ligand interactions, enabled by using specific terpyridine ligands, to fine-tune its ability to emit light and transport electrons.

Various transition metal ions, including Fe2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Mn2+, were introduced into the polymer to determine which species would coordinate most efficiently with the ligand, altering its optical nature. Results from fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies showed that the manganese ion coordinated the weakest to the ligand, while iron and cobalt ions bound the most efficiently and optimally altered emission intensity. Thus, iron and cobalt were identified as great candidates for metal-ligand coordination within the polymer for optimal optoelectronic capabilities. These findings contribute to the continued pursuit of creating efficient organic optoelectronics through the promising technique of metal-ligand interactions.

Keywords: organic electronics, conjugated polymer, optoelectronics, metal-ligand interactions

Availability

March 29 from 12-3pm, March 31 from 12-3pm, April 1 from 12-3pm

Special Considerations

Anita Hu will be presenting.

Share

COinS
 

Optimizing the Optoelectronic Properties of Conjugated Polymers Through Metal-Ligand Coordination

From the phones at our fingertips to the solar panels on our roofs, humans are becoming increasingly dependent on electronics for information, entertainment, and to power their daily lives. Further advancements are paving the way for a new age of high-performance, flexible devices. Organic electronics made from conjugated semiconducting polymers are showing great potential as a softer and more processable material than brittle silicon used in today’s devices, while exhibiting comparable charge transport to silicon.

However, one key challenge with these organic polymers is the difficulty to control their optical properties and charge transport in devices. Electronics must interact with and alter their lighting while efficiently conducting electricity. Therefore, the desired material must be tuneable to precisely control these important properties. In this research, a novel organic diketopyrrolopyrrole-based conjugated polymer is presented as a leading candidate for optoelectronics. This polymer uses noncovalent metal-ligand interactions, enabled by using specific terpyridine ligands, to fine-tune its ability to emit light and transport electrons.

Various transition metal ions, including Fe2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Mn2+, were introduced into the polymer to determine which species would coordinate most efficiently with the ligand, altering its optical nature. Results from fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies showed that the manganese ion coordinated the weakest to the ligand, while iron and cobalt ions bound the most efficiently and optimally altered emission intensity. Thus, iron and cobalt were identified as great candidates for metal-ligand coordination within the polymer for optimal optoelectronic capabilities. These findings contribute to the continued pursuit of creating efficient organic optoelectronics through the promising technique of metal-ligand interactions.

Keywords: organic electronics, conjugated polymer, optoelectronics, metal-ligand interactions