Title

Diabetes-Related Complications Among Indigenous People

Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty Sponsor

Kate Kemplin

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Background: Type II diabetes is a chronic health condition that requires proper management of blood glucose levels. Poor glucose management can lead to many diabetic-related complications throughout the course of one’s lifetime. Indigenous communities face many barriers in receiving health care, which can lead to poorer diabetes management.

Purpose: The purpose of this integrative review is to investigate if Indigenous adults who have type II diabetes are at greater risk for developing diabetic-related complications over their lifespan compared to non-Indigenous adults with type II diabetes.

Methods: A thorough literature review was completed through electronic sources including CINAHL, PubMed, Google Scholar and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health. Inclusion criteria involved studies with participants over 18 years of age, had two groups of participants that identify either Indigenous or non-Indigenous, have been diagnosed with type II diabetes, and experience at least one diabetic-related complication.

Results: Results are not yet completed as analysis is ongoing. However, preliminary results suggest that Indigenous people with type II diabetes suffer more extreme diabetic-related complications compared to non-Indigenous people. Early identification and proper management can decrease diabetic related complications. Prevention strategies, such as building culturally sensitive therapeutic relationships with Indigenous peoples and targeted screening clinics will be discussed.

Conclusion: The results of this review will help identify the diabetic-related complications that Indigenous peoples with type II diabetes experience as well as associated barriers. This knowledge can direct community-based programs to manage the complications of diabetes in Indigenous peoples which aid in “Building Viable, Healthy and Safe Communities.”

Availability

March 31st (anytime) or April 1 (after 10am)

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Diabetes-Related Complications Among Indigenous People

Background: Type II diabetes is a chronic health condition that requires proper management of blood glucose levels. Poor glucose management can lead to many diabetic-related complications throughout the course of one’s lifetime. Indigenous communities face many barriers in receiving health care, which can lead to poorer diabetes management.

Purpose: The purpose of this integrative review is to investigate if Indigenous adults who have type II diabetes are at greater risk for developing diabetic-related complications over their lifespan compared to non-Indigenous adults with type II diabetes.

Methods: A thorough literature review was completed through electronic sources including CINAHL, PubMed, Google Scholar and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health. Inclusion criteria involved studies with participants over 18 years of age, had two groups of participants that identify either Indigenous or non-Indigenous, have been diagnosed with type II diabetes, and experience at least one diabetic-related complication.

Results: Results are not yet completed as analysis is ongoing. However, preliminary results suggest that Indigenous people with type II diabetes suffer more extreme diabetic-related complications compared to non-Indigenous people. Early identification and proper management can decrease diabetic related complications. Prevention strategies, such as building culturally sensitive therapeutic relationships with Indigenous peoples and targeted screening clinics will be discussed.

Conclusion: The results of this review will help identify the diabetic-related complications that Indigenous peoples with type II diabetes experience as well as associated barriers. This knowledge can direct community-based programs to manage the complications of diabetes in Indigenous peoples which aid in “Building Viable, Healthy and Safe Communities.”