Title

Socio-economic Status as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes; An Integrative Review

Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Poster Presentation

Faculty

Faculty of Nursing

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kate Kemplin

Abstract/Description of Original Work

Introduction: High rates of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) are becoming more prevalent in our society. This poses a challenge to our healthcare system, which is already overwhelmed. Risk factors for T2DM include many that could be prevented if appropriate lifestyle and diet were incorporated. However, some individuals may not have access to nutritious food or lack the knowledge of healthy habits and disease prevention.

Methods: We conducted an integrative review of quantitative studies to determine if low income influences the risk of developing T2DM in adults. We analyzed statistical methods and the quality of the research relating to this problem, as well as the clinical significance for nurses and other health professionals in order to prevent development of T2DM. We are unaware of previous integrative reviews done on this topic.

Results: Preliminary analysis of the literature indicate that factors such as being overweight (high body mass index), low education, low income, experiencing persistent low income and being a new immigrant significantly increase one’s risk of developing T2DM.

Conclusion: This integrative review will be used to provide valuable information for healthcare professionals on factors that increase the risk of developing T2DM. These findings can lead to change in allocating means to those less fortunate and providing them with education about healthier lifestyles and resources available to them in preventing disease.

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Socio-economic Status as a Predictor for Type 2 Diabetes; An Integrative Review

Introduction: High rates of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) are becoming more prevalent in our society. This poses a challenge to our healthcare system, which is already overwhelmed. Risk factors for T2DM include many that could be prevented if appropriate lifestyle and diet were incorporated. However, some individuals may not have access to nutritious food or lack the knowledge of healthy habits and disease prevention.

Methods: We conducted an integrative review of quantitative studies to determine if low income influences the risk of developing T2DM in adults. We analyzed statistical methods and the quality of the research relating to this problem, as well as the clinical significance for nurses and other health professionals in order to prevent development of T2DM. We are unaware of previous integrative reviews done on this topic.

Results: Preliminary analysis of the literature indicate that factors such as being overweight (high body mass index), low education, low income, experiencing persistent low income and being a new immigrant significantly increase one’s risk of developing T2DM.

Conclusion: This integrative review will be used to provide valuable information for healthcare professionals on factors that increase the risk of developing T2DM. These findings can lead to change in allocating means to those less fortunate and providing them with education about healthier lifestyles and resources available to them in preventing disease.