Standing

Graduate (Masters)

Type of Proposal

Oral Research Presentation

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kate Kemplin

Abstract/Description of Original Work

An Integrative Review on the Effect of School- Based Nutrition Programs on Obesity Rates in Indigenous Youth

Background

Obesity-related diseases are disproportionately pervasive within Indigenous communities in Canada (King et al., 2009). Obesity is linked to various chronic illnesses which lead to decreases in quality of life, loss of ability to work, increased morbidity and mortality, and a significant burden and financial strain on the healthcare system (MacEwan et al. 2011). Individuals under 15 years of age account for a greater proportion of the population within Indigenous communities; therefore, children are especially demographically significant in this context. School-based nutritional programs show promise in affecting positive change related to healthy eating behaviours amongst Indigenous children. However, there are no well-established guidelines or protocols related to these interventions, hence, the aim of this integrative review is to identify the most effective strategies in reducing obesity rates amongst Indigenous youth in Canada.

Methods

To date, this integrative review has consisted of searches in three peer-reviewed databases and a general web search for grey literature. Eligibility criteria were applied by three reviewers, and data were extracted and charted by six reviewers using components of culturally relevant education, increasing access to nutritious food choices, Indigenous ownership, and implementing physical activity programs.

Results

The literature review is ongoing. Preliminary results indicate school-based nutrition programs improve healthy eating knowledge and behaviours when paired with supplemental education regarding nutritional choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing sedentary behaviours (Valery et al., 2021). Combining immediate and long-term initiatives to combat the obesity crisis is important to decrease health disparities amongst Canadian Indigenous youth.

Conclusion

Through this integrative review, we hope to identify components of the most successful nutritional interventions within Indigenous communities in Canada. This will help guide the planning, development, and implementation of future nutrition programs.

Availability

Available

Special Considerations

Presenters will include Scott Berendsen, Natalie Gladwish, Jennifer-Grace Sharrow, Melissa Bonifazi, Rachel Raspburg, and Melissa Stein. The researchers may be accompanied by the professor, Dr. Kate Kemplin.

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An Integrative Review on the Effect of School- Based Nutrition Programs on Obesity Rates in Indigenous Youth

An Integrative Review on the Effect of School- Based Nutrition Programs on Obesity Rates in Indigenous Youth

Background

Obesity-related diseases are disproportionately pervasive within Indigenous communities in Canada (King et al., 2009). Obesity is linked to various chronic illnesses which lead to decreases in quality of life, loss of ability to work, increased morbidity and mortality, and a significant burden and financial strain on the healthcare system (MacEwan et al. 2011). Individuals under 15 years of age account for a greater proportion of the population within Indigenous communities; therefore, children are especially demographically significant in this context. School-based nutritional programs show promise in affecting positive change related to healthy eating behaviours amongst Indigenous children. However, there are no well-established guidelines or protocols related to these interventions, hence, the aim of this integrative review is to identify the most effective strategies in reducing obesity rates amongst Indigenous youth in Canada.

Methods

To date, this integrative review has consisted of searches in three peer-reviewed databases and a general web search for grey literature. Eligibility criteria were applied by three reviewers, and data were extracted and charted by six reviewers using components of culturally relevant education, increasing access to nutritious food choices, Indigenous ownership, and implementing physical activity programs.

Results

The literature review is ongoing. Preliminary results indicate school-based nutrition programs improve healthy eating knowledge and behaviours when paired with supplemental education regarding nutritional choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing sedentary behaviours (Valery et al., 2021). Combining immediate and long-term initiatives to combat the obesity crisis is important to decrease health disparities amongst Canadian Indigenous youth.

Conclusion

Through this integrative review, we hope to identify components of the most successful nutritional interventions within Indigenous communities in Canada. This will help guide the planning, development, and implementation of future nutrition programs.