Title

Agreement

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

15-5-1999 9:00 AM

End Date

17-5-1999 5:00 PM

Abstract

Classically an argument terminates when the parties involved agree to the truth of a proposition known as the claim. On Gilbert's model of multi-model argumentation this approach is inadequate since a "claim" as such does not exist except as a logical artifact or abbreviation. In its place one must consider a "position," an object that contains within it much more information than can be found in an individual statement. While this adds a greater amount of complexity, it has the advantage of more ac curately describing the workings of marketplace argumentation.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Response to Submission

Richard Fulkerson, Commentary on Gilbert

Reader's Reactions

Michael Leff, Commentary on Gellis (May 1999)

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Philosophy Commons

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 5:00 PM

Agreement

Classically an argument terminates when the parties involved agree to the truth of a proposition known as the claim. On Gilbert's model of multi-model argumentation this approach is inadequate since a "claim" as such does not exist except as a logical artifact or abbreviation. In its place one must consider a "position," an object that contains within it much more information than can be found in an individual statement. While this adds a greater amount of complexity, it has the advantage of more ac curately describing the workings of marketplace argumentation.