Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Restricted Access

Start Date

3-6-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

6-6-2009 5:00 PM

Abstract

This paper attempts to trace a series of theoretical and political challenges between the early 1970s and the mid-1980s that advocates of Canadian informal logic movement had to overcome for making informal logic as a legitimate philosophical inquiry. Based on a historical narrative that reveals a trajectory of the development of informal logic using oral history interviews and archival research, this paper offers proposals for a research agenda for history of argumentation/informal logic.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Jun 3rd, 9:00 AM Jun 6th, 5:00 PM

Toward a History of Argumentation: Canadian informal logic

University of Windsor

This paper attempts to trace a series of theoretical and political challenges between the early 1970s and the mid-1980s that advocates of Canadian informal logic movement had to overcome for making informal logic as a legitimate philosophical inquiry. Based on a historical narrative that reveals a trajectory of the development of informal logic using oral history interviews and archival research, this paper offers proposals for a research agenda for history of argumentation/informal logic.