Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

critical thinking, pedagogy, alternative argument, Weston, Paul, Govier, wild

Start Date

18-5-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

21-5-2011 5:00 PM

Abstract

This paper responds to Anthony Weston’s “What if Teaching Went Wild?” (2004), in which he proposes a radical approach to environmental education, suggesting among other things a stress on “otherness”. Comparing Weston’s proposal to Richard Paul’s (1992) concept of the “strong sense” critical thinker, and to Trudy Govier’s (2010) rationale for her pedagogy of argument, I suggest that “going wild” in standalone critical thinking courses could provide a positive, unsettling push, helping students to reconnect through the otherness of alternative argumentation.

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Eating flowers, holding hands: Should critical thinking pedagogy ‘go wild’?

University of Windsor

This paper responds to Anthony Weston’s “What if Teaching Went Wild?” (2004), in which he proposes a radical approach to environmental education, suggesting among other things a stress on “otherness”. Comparing Weston’s proposal to Richard Paul’s (1992) concept of the “strong sense” critical thinker, and to Trudy Govier’s (2010) rationale for her pedagogy of argument, I suggest that “going wild” in standalone critical thinking courses could provide a positive, unsettling push, helping students to reconnect through the otherness of alternative argumentation.