Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

abstract individual, applied ethics, appropriative alienation, common good, humanist princi-ples, jurist, nothingness, philosophy of argument, reification, social justice, subjective idealism

Start Date

18-5-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

21-5-2011 5:00 PM

Abstract

Humanist concerns to empower human beings and to promote justice inspired the modern argumentation movement. Turning to audience adherence and acceptability of inferential links raised a spectre of pernicious relativism that undermines concerns for justice. Invoking Perelman’s universal audi-ence as a remedy only begs the question with ‘whose universal audience?’ and frustrates fulfilling the jus-tice commitment. Turning discourse toward the common good better addresses concerns of justice and social justice.

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Shifting focus from the universal audience to the common good

University of Windsor

Humanist concerns to empower human beings and to promote justice inspired the modern argumentation movement. Turning to audience adherence and acceptability of inferential links raised a spectre of pernicious relativism that undermines concerns for justice. Invoking Perelman’s universal audi-ence as a remedy only begs the question with ‘whose universal audience?’ and frustrates fulfilling the jus-tice commitment. Turning discourse toward the common good better addresses concerns of justice and social justice.