Location

McMaster University

Document Type

Restricted Access

Start Date

1-6-2005 9:00 AM

End Date

1-6-2005 5:00 PM

Abstract

In The Uses of Argument, Toulmin takes great effort to ensure that, although not formally, good argument is experienced as a logical enterprise. However, such an informally logically driven theory of argumentation cannot take into account the persuasive effects inherent in argumentative discourse that move a given audience to accept a claim. I argue that, while Toulmin's model is a commendable step towards a rhetorical theory of argumentation, he misses two important rhetorical principles: 1. Arguments will always have rhetorically persuasive components that cannot be evaluated in terms of logical validity. 2. Good arguments are lasting arguments that stay with the audience.

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Jun 1st, 9:00 AM Jun 1st, 5:00 PM

The Uses of Rhetorical Argument

McMaster University

In The Uses of Argument, Toulmin takes great effort to ensure that, although not formally, good argument is experienced as a logical enterprise. However, such an informally logically driven theory of argumentation cannot take into account the persuasive effects inherent in argumentative discourse that move a given audience to accept a claim. I argue that, while Toulmin's model is a commendable step towards a rhetorical theory of argumentation, he misses two important rhetorical principles: 1. Arguments will always have rhetorically persuasive components that cannot be evaluated in terms of logical validity. 2. Good arguments are lasting arguments that stay with the audience.