Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

credibility, epistemic privilege, experience, Hume, Nagel, standpoint theory, testimony, qualia, victims, Wittgenstein

Start Date

22-5-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

25-5-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

The authority of first person claims may be understood from an epistemic perspective or as a matter of social practice. Building on accounts of Hume, Nagel, and several more recent authors, it is argued that this authority should be understood as limited. To extend it beyond notions of what it is like to experience something, we shift from what should be a narrow subjective edge to a territory of objective claims, thereby reasoning incorrectly. A relevant application is the supposed authority of victims.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Philosophy Commons

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May 22nd, 9:00 AM May 25th, 5:00 PM

Reflections on the authority of personal experience

University of Windsor

The authority of first person claims may be understood from an epistemic perspective or as a matter of social practice. Building on accounts of Hume, Nagel, and several more recent authors, it is argued that this authority should be understood as limited. To extend it beyond notions of what it is like to experience something, we shift from what should be a narrow subjective edge to a territory of objective claims, thereby reasoning incorrectly. A relevant application is the supposed authority of victims.